August 14, 2003

Room 290, Hearst Mining Building

Room 290 in the newly-renovated Hearst Mining Building is furnished with Aeron chairs--20 Aeron chairs. That's a lot of Aeron chairs.

I hope they got them really cheap off some dot-com fire sale, because if these chairs weren't gotten really cheap--if the university spent serious money to fill these conference rooms with Aeron chairs--I'm not going to be a happy camper.

Posted by DeLong at August 14, 2003 05:57 PM | TrackBack

Comments

Please keep us updated, I'd be very curious to see what the university priorities are...

Posted by: Greg Wright on August 14, 2003 06:25 PM

I got mine Aeron at the Wine.com auction. $500. The dealers weren't getting them cheap. On the other hand 400-500 for a durable chair isn't a bad deal. Cheap chairs don't last.

Posted by: Dave Roberts on August 14, 2003 07:14 PM

I would imagine many of the students will feel the same.

Posted by: mattH on August 14, 2003 08:12 PM

Are they fully tricked out?

When Bank One bought them for everyone on my floor (way more than 20) the ones we got were missing one or two adjustments.

I'd assume that'd be a way to reduce the cost of new ones.

Employees could also buy one for their home; I think it cost around $450, but I'm not sure. That was quite a while ago.

Posted by: Jon H on August 14, 2003 08:20 PM

This *is* right after the UCs announce fees going up and budgets shot, right?

Posted by: Dan on August 14, 2003 09:22 PM

I think there is a distinct advantage to using Aeron chairs on seminar rooms. Note that the Herman Miller page for the Aeron mentions its heat circulation properties, which reduce the thermal discomfort associated with long periods of seating. When body heat raises, the blood pressure lowers, and people feel sleepy. The heat circulation makes this less likely.

Ergo, Aeron chairs will reduce the likelihood of the audience falling asleep as certain speakers drone on about axioms in a monotone while staring at their shoelaces. Not that any of that would ever happen in an Economic History seminar, but I guess the room may be used for other seminars...

Cheers.

(And in other news, the university has started layoffs.)

Posted by: Jose Silva on August 14, 2003 11:39 PM

At a university, I think talking about how long these chairs will last is quite disingenuous. Let's get real here---does any chair in such an environment stay in the same conference room for ten years without mysteriously disappearing somewhere else, being involved in some sorts of destructive shenanigans and so on?

Posted by: Maynard Handley on August 14, 2003 11:39 PM

Or just being tossed out when the conference room is renovated in a few years.

Posted by: Barry on August 15, 2003 04:28 AM

The large institutional price for Aeron chairs isn't that high. I work for the Fed govt, and our price is $429 (last I checked). However, we are usually required to purchase furniture from Unicor (the Federal prisons), and their office chairs are more expensive and less comfortable.

Posted by: bob cox on August 15, 2003 05:08 AM

Use of Aeron chairs in conference rooms--which you see all of the time--is a really stupid misuse. The adjustability of the chairs is a great benefit for a desk chair, where you set it up once and then benefit every time you sit at your desk. But a conference room chair should just suit you adequately without any tinkering. Aerons in conference rooms always end up in wacky adjustment settings that are hard to fix, so the adjustments become a disadvantage.

Posted by: Jonathan Korman on August 15, 2003 11:46 AM

Use of Aeron chairs in conference rooms--which you see all of the time--is a really stupid misuse. The adjustability of the chairs is a great benefit for a desk chair, where you set it up once and then benefit every time you sit at your desk. But a conference room chair should just suit you adequately without any tinkering. Aerons in conference rooms always end up in wacky adjustment settings that are hard to fix, so the adjustments become a disadvantage.

Posted by: Jonathan Korman on August 15, 2003 11:47 AM

Well, there are actually a lot of different Aeron chairs, the ones in Hearst I think are a conference room type: no super-armrests and the like. Still seems annoyingly gold-plated, and I too would like to know where the money came from. "Just" $500 can buy a more-than decent *Nix workstation for a student computer lab.

However, when Soda Hall opened, the grad student offices were furnished with what, at the time, were high end desk chairs (we called them the "Star Trek chairs" becaues of the moveable armrests. Most are, shockingly enough, still in the offices nearly 10 years later!

Posted by: Nicholas Weaver on August 15, 2003 11:52 AM

Well, there are actually a lot of different Aeron chairs, the ones in Hearst I think are a conference room type: no super-armrests and the like. Still seems annoyingly gold-plated, and I too would like to know where the money came from. "Just" $500 can buy a more-than decent *Nix workstation for a student computer lab.

However, when Soda Hall opened, the grad student offices were furnished with what, at the time, were high end desk chairs (we called them the "Star Trek chairs" becaues of the moveable armrests. Most are, shockingly enough, still in the offices nearly 10 years later!

Posted by: Nicholas Weaver on August 15, 2003 11:53 AM

Cultural deprivation. I'd never heard of these things, so I did a quick google. Apparently not everyone admires them... this page is a hoot:

http://www.dack.com/misc/aeron.html

Posted by: Canadian F&B Reader on August 15, 2003 02:27 PM
Post a comment