October 13, 2003

The Future of Scholarly Publishing

Michael Froomkin watches the future of scholarly publishing happen:

Discourse.net: Watch the Future of Journal Publishing Happen: All hail the Public Library of Science Biology the free, elitist (in the nicest possible way), peer-reviewed, open-access journal whose inaugural issue appears today. This is the future for journal publishing, especially as even libraries are being priced out of the market for journals, especially scientific ones. All materials in this web-published attack on high-priced dead tree scientific publishing will be subject to the PLoS Open-Access License which happens to be identical to the Creative Commons Attribution License

Posted by DeLong at October 13, 2003 12:00 PM | TrackBack

Comments

In my field, there's a journal which is electronic-only: Physical Review Special Topics --- Accelerators and Beams (PRST-AB, http://prst-ab.aps.org ). Per the Sponsors page, access to the Journal is provided without charge or subscription; similarly, no charges or page limits to authors (note that all of the "sponsors" are national laboratories of the United States or Canada, hence in effect the sponsorship derives entirely from the government). The journal is peer-reviewed, and is enormously successful. I would say that in the 6 years that PRST-AB has been in existence, it has eclipsed its competitors as the foremost journal in the field.

Posted by: PT on October 13, 2003 03:46 PM

In my field, there's a journal which is electronic-only: Physical Review Special Topics --- Accelerators and Beams (PRST-AB, http://prst-ab.aps.org ). Per the Sponsors page, access to the Journal is provided without charge or subscription; similarly, no charges or page limits to authors (note that all of the "sponsors" are national laboratories of the United States or Canada, hence in effect the sponsorship derives entirely from the government). The journal is peer-reviewed, and is enormously successful. I would say that in the 6 years that PRST-AB has been in existence, it has eclipsed its competitors as the foremost journal in the field.

Posted by: PT on October 13, 2003 03:51 PM

I always felt sorry for Justinian II Rhinotmetos. Getting captured and mutilated by the Huns is one thing, but having your dual reigns remembered for that and that alone must be the final indignity.

Constantine XI Porphyrogenitos (purple-born) and Basil II Bulgaraoktonos (Bulgar-slayer) did somewhat better.

Posted by: Alan Grieve on October 13, 2003 05:11 PM

>>web-published attack on high-priced dead tree scientific publishing>> Yo man!

Posted by: Mats on October 13, 2003 11:53 PM

Cool - they bagged the robot monkey article which is getting so much attention.

Nice way to debut...

Posted by: Jon H on October 14, 2003 01:02 AM

Amusingly, the site is down at the moment owing to too much traffic. That seldom happens with the dead tree version!

Posted by: James Joyner on October 14, 2003 10:29 AM
Post a comment