October 16, 2003

This Is a Joke

Crooked Timber is wrong. This is a joke. It is an unintended joke--which makes it all the funnier:

Crooked Timber: Shenanigans! : Via Atrios, this is not a joke.

Concerned about the appearance of disarray and feuding within his administration as well as growing resistance to his policies in Iraq, President Bush - living up to his recent declaration that he is in charge - told his top officials to “stop the leaks” to the media, or else.

News of Bush’s order leaked almost immediately.

Bush told his senior aides Tuesday that he “didn’t want to see any stories” quoting unnamed administration officials in the media anymore, and that if he did, there would be consequences, said a senior administration official who asked that his name not be used.

Posted by DeLong at October 16, 2003 01:29 PM | TrackBack

Comments

Interestingly, even when there is fighting among the Administration members, the conservative parts of the media always learn quickly which lead to follow. Sycophants all. Repeat after me, the war in Iraq was wonderful because.... Duh.

Posted by: lise on October 16, 2003 01:55 PM

http://www.nytimes.com/2003/10/16/opinion/16DOWD.html

On Monday, Representative George Nethercutt Jr., a Republican from Washington State who visited Iraq, chimed in to help the White House: "The story of what we've done in the postwar period is remarkable. It is a better and more important story than losing a couple of soldiers every day." The congressman puts the casual back in casualty....

Posted by: lise on October 16, 2003 01:57 PM

This administration is using a "Floggings will continue until morale improves..." approach to management.

Posted by: Jose Silva on October 16, 2003 02:07 PM

Unintended? I'd like to have seen the expression on the face of the unnamed senior administration official. Was s/he giggling?

Posted by: Peter MacLeod on October 16, 2003 03:03 PM

Unintended? I'd like to have seen the expression on the face of the unnamed senior administration official. Was s/he giggling?

Posted by: Peter MacLeod on October 16, 2003 03:06 PM

I think the only person involved who didn't intend it was Bush.

Posted by: Matthew McIrvin on October 16, 2003 10:19 PM

I'm tired of unnamed sources. As the British "sexed up" dossier saga and the Blair-NY Times incident prove, I think reporters just make this stuff up a lot of times. If a direct source is not on the record, I think you have to take all of it with a grain a salt.

Posted by: Chad Peterson on October 17, 2003 06:16 AM

Chad P., don't forget to include all those unnamed sources quoted by Judith Miller of the NY Times about all those WMD 'finds' in Iraq while your're at it.

Posted by: David W. on October 17, 2003 06:27 AM

I'm a big fan of "off the record" comments and unnamed sources. I do think that the media ought to use a little more discretion when handling information. I mean, that's the point of being media, right? If you know somebody's lying, you should report it. (Anyway what good is a source if they lie to you? Do you think you're in on the game somehow?) If it's obvious that they're lying and you don't know it, that's bad too.

Seriously the original post is hillarious.

Posted by: Saam Barrager on October 17, 2003 09:34 AM

Tony Blair lied and lied and is lying still about WMDs at the ready in Iraq. The BBC was entirely right. British intelligence was "sexed up" in the Prime Minister's office.

Posted by: Emma on October 17, 2003 11:42 AM
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