August 29, 2002
European Economic History Reading Course: Fall 2002: Second Draft Syllabus

1. Basics

  • September 12:
  • Robert Bates and Avner Greif (1998), Analytical Narratives (Princeton: Princeton University Press).
  • Massimo Livi-Bacci (2001), A Concise History of World Population (Oxford: Blackwell).

  • September 19:
  • Douglass North (1981), Structure and Change in Economic History (New York: Norton).
  • Douglass North (1990), Institutions, Institutional Change, and Economic Performance (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press).
  • Jack Goldstone (1987), "Cultural Orthodoxy, Risk, and Innovation: the Divergence of the East and West in the Early Modern World," Sociological Theory, 119-135.

  • September 26
  • Jared Diamond (1999). Guns, Germs, and Steel (New York: W.W. Norton).

2. Europe Before the Industrial Revolution

  • October 3:
  • Carlo Cipolla (1980), Before the Industrial Revolution (New York: Norton).
  • Philip Hoffman (1988), "Institutions and Agriculture in Old Regime France," Politics and Society, 16, 241-264.

  • October 10:
  • Jan de Vries and Ad van der Woude (1997), The First Modern Economy: Success, Failure, and Perseverance of the Dutch Economy, 1500-1815 (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press).
  • Jan De Vries, “The Industrious Revolution and the Industrious Revolution,” Journal of Economic History 54 (1994): 249-270

3. The European World Economy

  • October 17:
  • Kenneth Pomeranz (2000), The Great Divergence: Europe, China, and the Making of a Modern World Economy (Princeton: Princeton University Press).
  • Richard Easterlin (1981), "Why Isn't the Whole World Developed?" Journal of Economic History, 1-21.

  • October 24:
  • Barbara Solow, ed. (1991), Slavery and the Rise of the Atlantic System (Cambridge UK: Cambridge University Press).

4. The Coming of the Industrial Age

  • October 31:
  • FF Mendels (1972), "Proto-industrialization: The First Phase of the Industrialization Process," Journal of Economic History 32(4): 241-61.
  • NFR Crafts (1985), British Economic Growth during the Industrial Revolution (Oxford: Oxford University Press).
  • David Landes (1986), "What Do Bosses Really Do?" Journal of Economic History (September).
  • Gregory Clark (1994), "Factory Discipline," Journal of Economic History 54 (no. 1): 128-63.

  • November 7:
  • Joel Mokyr, ed. (1999), The British Industrial Revolution: An Economic Perspective (Boulder, CO: Westview Press).
  • NFR Crafts (1977), "The Industrial Revolution in England and France: Some Thoughts on the Question, "Why Was England First?" Economic History Review, 429-441.

5. Globalization

  • November 14:
  • Barry Eichengreen and Marc Flandreau (1997), The Gold Standard in Theory and History

  • November 21:
  • WA Lewis (1977), The Evolution of the International Economic Order (Princeton: Princeton University Press).
  • Kevin O'Rourke and Jeffrey Williamson (1999), Globalization and History: The Evolution of a Nineteenth Century Atlantic Economy (Caqmbridge: MIT Press).
  • Patrick O'Brien (1982), "European Economic Development: the Contribution of the Periphery," Economic History Review, 1-18.

6. To Be Determined


Potential Students:

  • Rui Pedro Esteves <resteves@econ.Berkeley.EDU>

Link to the first draft of this reading list.

Posted by DeLong at August 29, 2002 09:44 AM | Trackback

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Comments

A history of European economics should also include the free-trade debates (Frederic Bastiat) and the Austrian school (Menger and von Mises), especially their arguments against socialism by contrast with their historical welfare-state and fascist/nazi contexts.

Posted by: Jinn of Quality on August 29, 2002 12:51 PM

John Nye, "The Myth of Free-Trade Britain and Fortress France: Tariffs and Trade in the 19th Century," Journal of Economic History (1991).

John Nye has done some great work debunking the conventional wisdom of free-trade Britain and Fortress France. A great read...

Posted by: Ram Ahluwalia on August 29, 2002 01:30 PM

John Nye, "The Myth of Free-Trade Britain and Fortress France: Tariffs and Trade in the 19th Century," Journal of Economic History (1991).

John Nye has done some great work debunking the conventional wisdom of free-trade Britain and Fortress France. A great read...

Posted by: Ram Ahluwalia on August 29, 2002 01:31 PM

John Nye, "The Myth of Free-Trade Britain and Fortress France: Tariffs and Trade in the 19th Century," Journal of Economic History (1991).

John Nye has done some great work debunking the conventional wisdom of free-trade Britain and Fortress France. A great read...

Posted by: Ram Ahluwalia on August 29, 2002 01:32 PM

John Nye, "The Myth of Free-Trade Britain and Fortress France: Tariffs and Trade in the 19th Century," Journal of Economic History (1991).

John Nye has done some great work debunking the conventional wisdom of free-trade Britain and Fortress France. A great read...

Posted by: Ram Ahluwalia on August 29, 2002 01:33 PM

oops... longlag-click syndrome leads to redundant posts... didn't realize how accomodating the server actually is...

Posted by: Ram on August 29, 2002 01:36 PM

cool reading list...but as someone who likes econ history it can be an occasional handicap for me to er...not know the more basic histories of these countries, with regimes and borders changing so much. So how about a general reference like Norman Davies "Europe: A History" (OUP).

Posted by: kcarey on August 29, 2002 02:27 PM

This is a nice resource. Maybe I'll do my own personal reading course one of these days. If you have lists like this from some other courses you've taught, it might be nice to have a little section of your site devoted to that. Or just lists of books which you have found helpful for learning about various subjects...

Posted by: Nick on August 29, 2002 03:35 PM

Holy smokes thats a lot of reading for an undergrad course.

Posted by: Dennis O'Dea on August 30, 2002 10:08 AM

EUROPE ADRIFT by John Newhouse
Pantheon Books

THE ROTTEN HEART OF EUROPE: THE DIRTY WAR
FOR EUROPE'S MONEY by Bernard Connolly
Faber and Faber

Posted by: 49eels on August 30, 2002 06:35 PM

Just two comments off the top of my head.

In the globalisation section why not include Hatton & Williamson's "Age of Mass Migration" - globalisation is after all the movement of trade capital AND people, and the period covered saw a hell of a lot of movement of people (and thus labour) within and out of Europe, with equally enormous consequences. Why do most economists tend to forget that in Y = Af(K,L), the second parameter has some importance. Trying to teach economics without population is worse than staging Hamlet without the prince.

Secondly why not something on cycles of deflation/inflation. Zarnovitz claims to identify six periods - three of each. What would be nice, but really nice (thinking of Bose Einstein and those phase transitions mentioned higher up this blog), would be to try to begin to understand why there are these regime shifts. This could certainly come in quite useful right now, especially over there in Japan. Or is it just that, as Temin fears, economists have lost their sense of history.

Posted by: Edward Hugh on September 5, 2002 11:12 AM
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